Health Tip: Know Your Family’s Medical History



-- Having full knowledge of your family health history is empowering and can be an effective way to stay healthier.

Your doctor may review your family health history in deciding whether you and other family members need certain screening tests, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says.

The CDC suggests how to keep a family health history:

  • Talk to family members to get details about each person's medical past. Be sure to include information about chronic diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, high cholesterol and high blood pressure.
  • Determine if there is a family history of cancer or stroke.
  • Be aware of your family's ancestry.
  • Share your history with your doctor and other family members.

Source: https://www.drugs.com/news/health-tip-know-your-family-s-medical-history-80249.html?utm_source=ddc&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=Health+Tip%3A+Know+Your+Family%27s+Medical+History

Know Your Familys Medical History Black Health Matters



Screenings are important, because the earlier a disease is caught the earlier it can be treated. Having a close family member with a chronic disease increases your risk for developing the disease, but there is no such thing as bad or good genes. (HealthDay News), your doctor may have asked you for your family health history, but do you know why? Family history also is helpful in determining the kind of lifestyle and behaviors you should adopt. The tool is free and once you have filled out your family history, you can print out a chart detailing all of the information. Certain combinations of disease in the family, such as breast and ovarian cancer or diabetes and heart disease. Treatment for...

Healthy eating habits and regular exercise, for instance, are important for all of us, but could be even more important for people with a family history of heart disease. In 2008, African American women were 10 percent less likely to have been diagnosed with breast cancer; however, ’Mindfulness’ Might Help Some Conquer Chronic Pain they were almost 40 percent more likely to die from breast cancer, as compared to non-Hispanic white women. The highest age-adjusted incidence rate of cervical cancer occurs among head, Neck Cancers Up Among 9-11 Responders: Study Vietnamese American women (43 per 100,000 almost five times higher than the rate among is Brexit a Health Hazard? non-Hispanic white women (7.5 per 100,000). Recording your family health history is simple. Trinity, health is a Catholic health care organization that acts in accordance with the Catholic tradition and does not condone or support all practices covered in this site.